mySTMC

Applied Design Skills Technology

STMC recognizes the value that technological literacy has towards ensuring student success in post-secondary education and beyond. To that end, we offer a number of programs to ensure that students have the opportunity to learn and develop the skills they need in this important area. Our STEM – ICT/Robotics department uses industry standard software and equipment to facilitate student learning in a variety of areas, including digital media, engineering, website design, video editing and architectural design. Students can opt for courses offered in our highly innovative VEX Robotic Lab, our digital media facilities, our engineering and technology center, and our IT/Computer Science Lab.  Specialized equipment for student learning experiences in various centers include 3D printers, a Laser Cutter, robotics hardware, electronic and materials development tools, and up-to-date computer systems for design and development.

Courses

Digital Media 8
Media Arts 11
Media Arts 12
Materials Engineering 8

Materials Engineering 9 explores the use of polymers, timbers, engineered boards and electronics. The course develops student’s skills and ability to work through a problem using the design cycle via design thinking. Taught elements are exploring users and user contexts, properties and uses of materials, product analysis, design context analysis, circular economy, design communication techniques and methods, modelling and prototyping, plan of manufacture, computer aided design and manufacturing, analog and digital electronics, and trial and testing. The aim is to expose students to as many manufacturing factors used in the design, industrial, and manufacturing industry today.

With the students developing the above elements through practical projects. They will be able to develop what they have experienced and learnt in grade 8, or, if new to the course, develop new skills as they work through the projects.

Making is at the core of the course with the students spending the majority of lessons manufacturing.

Materials Engineering 9

Materials Engineering 9 explores the use of polymers, timbers, engineered boards and electronics. The course develops students skills and ability to work through a problem using the design cycle via design thinking. Taught elements are exploring users and user contexts,,  properties and uses of materials, product analysis, design context analysis, circular economy,, design communication techniques and methods, modelling and prototyping, plan of manufacture, computer aided design and manufacturing, analog and digital electronics, and trial and testing. The aim is to expose students to as many manufacturing factors used in the design, industrial, and manufacturing  industry today. 

With the students developing the above elements through practical projects. They will be able to develop what they have experienced and learnt in grade 8, or, if new to the course, develop new skills as they work through the projects. 

Making is at the core of the course with the students spending the majority of lessons manufacturing. 

Technology Explorations 10

The fundamental element of this course is to continually build on using the design cycle and design thinking in solving problems. The course develops critical thinking within a design context and students use what they have learnt in applying design thinking within a context. Creation of a tangible outcome is prevalent in most of the taught units. Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing are intertwined and develop to be the primary source of creating a testable outcome. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Levers and Linkages
  • Movement and Motion
  • Input, Process, Output
  • Power transfer
  • Hydraulics
  • Users Centered Design
  • Iterative Design
  • Manufacturing Scale
  • Product Life Cycle
  • Circular Economy
  • Design Communication
  • Autodesk Fusion 360
  • Sensors
  • Electronic switching
  • Passive Electronic Components
  • Plastic Moulding Methods

Much of the assessment is in line with the ADST Tech Ex Competencies, where all facets are considered equal.

Written and design work acts as key communication in demonstrating where theory has been incorporated within the project. The course develops students’ ability to describe, analyze, evaluate and justify in the written form. Numeracy and literacy play a very important role in the development of learning in each unit as it is key when working through the empathy and investigation stage of each unit to define and understand context.

Robotics 11

 

The Robotics 11 course covers practical application of systems and control that go into robotic construction and design, with a particular focus on mechanical components. Students will develop knowledge of the key individual elements (mechanical and electrical/electronic) with the goal of creating effective structures, behaviours, and motion. High-level concepts about robotics will be introduced and discussed, such as robotic technology in the community and industry, similarities and differences between autonomous and remotely controlled robots, and simple robotic design and production. Prerequisite: Tech Explorations 10 or with Instructor’s permission (for 2022-2023 academic year)

 

 

Robotics 12

Robotics 12 complements the Robotics 11 course by shifting focus to logic and programming with common microcontrollers (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP32) using DC circuit concepts to connect various technologies. As a true interdisciplinary course, the gamut of skills identified in the ADST curriculum will be practiced and improved through the duration of this course.

Projects will be larger and more complete than in previous years, and will be tailored to specific student interests and societal trends. Students will spend a greater portion of time working with advanced topics such as autonomous strategies, sensor data processing, and situational analysis. A portion of the year will be set aside for student-led project choice – individuals will identify an area of interest for personal development, set measurable goals, and complete regular progress reports.

Computer Programming 11

The Grade 11 Computer Programming course is the first formal programming course offered at STMC, providing students with an opportunity to hone the programming foundation built in Technology Explorations 10. Continuing to work within the Javascript/ECMAScript ecosystem, students will have a broad range of experiences such as interactive web programming, cross-platform development, an introduction to server-side scripting, and even task automation in the browser. Specific topics will be explored based on class interest.

This course is primarily project- and experience-based, and students will be provided with ample class time to complete assigned materials. Students who work efficiently and manage their time well (and have a strong working knowledge of previous concepts) should not expect regular homework from this class. Additional assignments and extensions are available for students seeking further challenges.

Prerequisite: Tech Explorations 10 or with Instructor’s permission (for 2022-2023 academic year)

Computer Programming 12

As the direct successor to Computer Programming 11, this course continues development of JS/ES concepts in a multitude of environments. Students develop projects that build familiarity with libraries, frameworks, databases, REST services, and toolchains. Modular design is highlighted, and strategies for dividing tasks between team members are regularly practiced. By the end of the year, students will have proposed and worked on a non-profit project for a client either within the school or community.

This course is designed to be a lighter option to Computer Science 12; it focuses on increasing the breadth of projects rather than teaching advanced concepts with rigorous testing. Students who work efficiently and manage their time well should not expect regular homework from this class. A practical arts credit is provided instead of a mathematics credit, and students who are planning to enter a computer science program in university should consider the Computer Science 12 course instead.

Prerequisite: Computer Programming 11 or with Instructor’s permission (for 2022-2023 academic year)

Design Engineering 11

The Grade 11 course provides an advanced level of development and awareness and understanding of real-life experiences in designing and in the developments and opportunities seen in creative, manufacturing and engineering industries.

There is a lot of project-based learning to test your skills and you’ll see the outcome of your design from concept to making a tangible outcome. This means you’ll be able to build a great portfolio of your best-quality projects, academic and industry briefs, and case studies, during your studies.

Students learning will follow the below statements:

  • Demonstrate their understanding that all design and technological activity takes place within contexts that influence the outcomes design practice 
  • Develop an experienced understanding of an iterative design process and the relevance of these to industry practice 
  • Develop realistic design proposals as a result the exploration of design opportunities and users’ (and stakeholders) needs, wants and values
  • Develop decision making skills, including the planning and organization of time and resources when managing their own project work 
  • Develop a broad knowledge of materials, components and technologies and practical skills to develop high quality, imaginative and functional prototypes 
  • Become independent and critical thinkers who can adapt their technical knowledge and understanding to different design situations 
  • Be ambitious and open to explore and take design risks in order to stretch the development of design proposals, avoiding clichéd or stereotypical responses 
  • Use imagination, experimentation and combine ideas when designing 
  • Develop the skills to critique and refine their own ideas whilst designing and making 
  • Communicate their design ideas and decisions using different media and techniques, as appropriate for different audiences at key points in their designing 

Students are encouraged to have prior experience and knowledge  gained in grades 8 – 10 before embarking on the grade 11. If this is the case, all students must have a conversation with Mr. Bough to outline expectations. 

Design Engineering 12

The Grade 12 Design Engineering is a pre university preparation course for those students who want to go on and study Engineering, Design, Architecture, or any other relative field. The course is focused on working through the design cycle, and uses design thinking to think critically about how to solve them. Students communicate their findings in the written form, justifying their thoughts in context and how they could solve the problems they’ve discovered. 

This is not a course where students are passive. They do not all make the same item. This is a challenging course, where students use and follow user centered design in order to develop a written, simulated, or tangible outcome. Topics include:

  • CAD
  • CAM
  • Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)
  • Simulation
  • Testing
  • Ergonomics
  • Anthropometrics
  • Psychology and Physiology in Design
  • Biomechanics
  • Materials at an in depth level
  • Manufacturing Methods
  • Social and Economic Impacts of Solutions
  • Green and Sustainable Design
  • Resource Stewardship
  • Design and Engineering History
  • Electronics ( Assembly, Control, Passive and Control)
Graphic Production 11

Graphic Production 11 is a rigorous course requiring focus, self-motivation, teamwork, and the ability to work under pressure to meet fixed deadlines. The course is designed for students intending to pursue careers in journalism, business, graphic arts, or illustration. Essentially, the yearbook program is a business operating within the context of high school. Students are accountable not only to their instructor but to their peers within the class, and to the patrons of the business – namely the students of the school who purchase yearbooks. At the grade 11 level, students learn the basic skills necessary to create the yearbook. This includes computer software such as Adobe Photoshop and In Design, and the online software, Pixami. They learn, and develop their photography, journalistic, writing, layout and editing skills, as well as creative problem solving and business skills (teamwork, meeting deadlines, time management, showing initiative etc.) crucial in the yearbook environment. At the grade 11 level, students are not yet in leadership or editor roles but will often be partnered with Graphic Production 12 students to learn these skills for when they take Graphic Production 12.

Graphic Production 12

In Graphic Production 12 students further build on the knowledge and skills developed in Graphic Production (Yearbook) 11 while taking on a leadership position in editing, graphics, or general Yearbook production management.

Prerequisite: Graphic Production 11

Drafting 10

In this introductory Architectural Design course, students explore related career opportunities and develop employability skills in 2D and 3D design. Students are introduced to sketching, drawing and modelling techniques, tools, processes, and standards. They develop an understanding of the design process through research, and select, generate, and evaluate possible solutions through environmental, social, and cultural considerations.

Drafting 11

In this intermediate Architectural Design course, students build on the skills learned in Drafting 10 and work through the design process to solve more complex design problems. Students create and deliver impressive presentations with 3D models, animation walkthroughs, computer renderings, and technical drawings to communicate their ideas. They develop an understanding of building construction technologies and an appreciation for local and international architecture. Students will work on building a portfolio of work that can be used for post-secondary applications.

Prerequisite: Drafting 10